Systems

Please note. The staking plans and systems discussed below are just for information. Remember all betting puts your money at risk and there is no such thing as a certain winner.

Among How To Back Winners top horse racing strategies is to back the runners from the juvenile race on the opening day of Newmarket’s Craven Meeting  on their next start.
4 of the 6 two-year-olds which ran in equivalent race in 2010 won on their next outing, including Julius Geezer, who won at Chester at 12-1.
The system drew a blank last year, although Tell Dad, who went on to win three times including a Group 3 contest, was second in the race. The logic behind the system holds good and it would be no surprise to see it make a profit this season.

How to back winners ON staking plans.

The worst staking plan ever devised is the old double your stake until backing a winner plan where the staking progression goes 1 – 2 – 4 – 8 – 16- 32 – 64 – 128 – 256 – 512 – 1,024 points.

If you were backing at 1 point = £10, this staking plan would require an outlay of £160 on the next selection after just 4 losers and £320 on the next selection after 5 losers etc, etc. Apart from depleting any punter’s resources in double quick time, it would soon become impossible to find a bookmaker who would take such a big bet.

How to back winners is a firm believer in only increasing stakes substantially after a winner. So, if you start a betting sequence with a bank of 10 points and bet 1 point per bet, you only increase your stake to 2 points after the bank has doubled and reached 20 points.

How to back winners on systems.

The multiplier -A simple quick system for doubles and trebles for horse racing.

This system can be used for any races but it was designed primarily for TV racing. It is a quick and easy to follow formula that removes the need to study form and provides a good chance of a healthy return for a small outlay.

There is one basic rule as follows. Using the betting forecast in your daily newspaper, note the price of the favourite in a selected race. If the price of the first horse in the forecast is 2-1 or less write down that horse and the next horse in the betting forecast. These 2 horses are the selections for the race in question.

If the price of the favourite in a selected race is bigger than 2-1 write down that horse and the next 2 horses in the betting forecast. These 3 horses are the selections for the race in question.

Once you have your selections for the races you wish to cover you combine your selections in cross doubles. If race A has 2 selections and race B has 2 selections your bet will be 4 doubles. If race A has 2 selections and race B has 3 selections your bet will be 6 doubles and if race A has 3 selections and race B has 3 selections your bet will be 9 doubles.

The system works best in races with 12 or fewer runners. It is also best to avoid races of 4 or fewer runners and races where the favourite is odds-on in the forecast. But you can refine the system to suit your own needs. You can also expand it to have trebles or even accumulators.

This simple system can produce surprisingly good returns. A double with winners at 3-1 and 4-1 returns 20 points. A double with winners at 4-1 and 7-1 returns 40 points.

At Ascot on Saturday 9th October 2010 this system produced the winner of the three Ch4 races at odds of 7-1, 6-1 and 8-1, using the Racing Post betting forecasts. The doubles paid 55-1, 62-1 and 71-1. The treble paid 493-1. If you had covered these races at a unit stake of £1 your outlay would have been £54 and your return £612. A profit of £558.

Old faithful.

Here’s one of the oldest and still one of the best horse racing systems there is.

For a race to qualify every horse in the race must have run at least 4 times.

Give each horse in a race a rating of 100

Deduct 1 point from the rating for every win the horse has recorded in its last 4 starts.

Deduct 2 points from the rating for every second the horse has recorded in its last 4 starts.

Deduct 5 points from the rating for every third the horse has recorded in its last 4 starts.

Deduct 10 points from the rating for every fourth the horse has recorded in its last 4 starts.

Deduct 20 points from the rating for every unplaced run the horse has recorded in its last 4 starts.

Once you have made the calculations the horse with the highest rating is the selection.

For example if a horse has won all four of its last four starts it will have a rating of 96, the highest rating possible. If a horse has won three of its last four starts and been second on its other start it will have a rating of 95.

If you end up with more than one qualifier use your discretion to either discard the race or back the joint top rated horses.

You should monitor this system and tweak it to suit your own particular betting needs.

Change the number of points you deduct, limit the field sizes or specialize in certain types of races.

Like everything else in this world horse racing is changing and the system should be adapted to recognize changes.

Do not back qualifiers with ratings below 75 points

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